Helping Women be the most Beautiful, Inside and Out

Fun In The Sun

 

It’s Summertime! 
It’s time to head outdoors for those “Fun In The Sun” activities.

But while having fun be aware that there are “not so fun” affects the Sun can have on your skin, your health and your life.

The Sun produces 3 types of rays:

1.  UVA-the most common, is the cause of  skin aging, and wrinkling

2.  UVB- causes sunburn, cataracts

3.  UVC-the most dangerous, are obsorbed by our atmosphere

Tips for protecting your skin from the damaging effects of the Sun:

Stay out of the direct rays of the sun between 10am and 2pm when the rays are the strongest.

Wear sunscreen with a SPF factor of between 15 and 30, apply liberally on your face, hands and arms especially. 

Make sure your sunscreen protects both UVA and UVB rays.

Wear sunglasses with 100% UV blocking lenses to protect around your eyes.

Don’t use sunscreen on children less than 6 months old, just keep them covered and out of the sun.

Wear protective clothing such as hats, long-sleeved shirts, long skirts, or pants.

Things you should know about the sun and your skin:

Contrary to popular belief, a tan is not “healthy.” A suntan is a sign that damage has been done to your skin.

When exposed to the sun’s UV rays, your skin’s melanocytes produce melanin, the dark pigment that creates a tan. A tan is your skin’s attempt to prevent UV rays from doing any further damage to the sensitive skin cells in your epidermis, but the protection only goes so far.

A tan does not help protect your skin from getting a sunburn in the future. A tan is equivalent to merely an SPF 4!

UVA breaks down the collagen structure which results in wrinkles.  Once collagen is damaged, it cannot re-build itself.

Up to 80% of skin aging is caused by the sun.  Most premature aging is caused by sun damage to skin.

Exposure to UV radiation can accelerate skin aging and make you appear older than you are. At higher altitudes there is less atmosphere to filter out the sun’s dangerous UV rays. For every 1,000 feet above sea level, you are exposed to 5% more UV radiation.  

People with light colored eyes are  more susceptible to retinal damage and cataracts as a result of overexposure to the sun.

Water and snow can reflect up to 90% of the sun’s UV rays back at you.

Certain medications can make skin and eyes more sensitive to sunlight, photosensitizing drugs include: acne medicines, antibiotics, antihistamines, oral contraceptives and sulfa drugs.

Freckles and sun spots are signs of skin damage and develop as a result of too much sun exposure.  They are frequently found on face, legs and back of hands.  Individuals who sunbathe regularly may develop freckles and sun spots all over their skin.

Tanning beds emit ultra-violet radiations.

It is important to understand that all sunburns increase the risk of three types of skin cancer, which includes basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

Known risk factors for skin cancer include the following:

Skin cancers are more common in people with light-colored skin, hair, and eyes.

Having a family history of melanoma increases the risk of developing this cancer.

Nonmelanoma skin cancers are more common after age 40.

Most skin cancers occur on areas of the skin that are regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This is considered the primary cause of all skin cancers.

Bronze skin may look beautiful on those blessed with naturally dark or olive tone skin.  But if you have fair skin,  beware, a short term tan is not worth the long term risk to your health.

I did’nt mean to ruin your summer vacation! 

You can still go out and have  “Fun in the Sun”, just don’t be a “sun worshipper”, remember to limit your exposure no matter what age you are, and protect yourself and your loved ones from those nasty rays.

Related Article:  Beauty Only Skin Deep?

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Comments on: "Fun In The Sun" (2)

  1. Sweet site, I haven’t noticed beautyminded.wordpress.com till now in my surfing! Continiue the good work!

  2. Wonderful site and theme, would really like to see a bit more content though!
    Great post all around, added your XML feed! Love this theme, too!

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